Tag Archives: acne

Halloween Face Paint – Trick, Treat & Toxic.

 

Halloween is this week and the costumes are already in place to be adorned by children and adults. Halloween face-paint is all the rave. It’s the art of creation that makes any relationship with a makeup artist, a very prized one. But just how safe is the paint you’re about to smear all over your little one’s and your own face?

HALLOWEEN FACE PAINT – TRICK, TREAT OR TOXIC.

If you’re using face paint to add to your look this Halloween, it’s important to make sure you’re choosing the right products to avoid any harmful effects or skin reactions.

According to a report in 2009 by the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics (CSC), a national coalition of nonprofit groups working to eliminate harmful chemicals from personal care products.

After testing ten major kids face paints sold in the US, the study found that all ten of the face paints tested contained lead.

Six out of the ten face paints tested contained the known skin allergens, nickel, cobalt and/or chromium, at levels far exceeding the recommendations of industry studies.

Yes, the amounts were low – but, as Campaign for Safe Cosmetics (CSC) points out, there’s no safe level of lead exposure, which is why the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends protecting children from it.

Unfortunately things haven’t changed since then in the industry, as a recent report by (CSC)“Pretty Scary 2: Unmasking Toxic Chemicals in Kids’ Makeup was spearheaded by the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics and released by the Breast Cancer Fund and the California Public Interest Research Group. The report comes courtesy of the Breast Cancer Fund (BCF), which sent 48 different Halloween face paints to an independent lab to have them tested for the presence of heavy metals such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury. Nearly half the paints had trace amounts of at least one heavy metal, and some contained up to four different ones. Paints with dark pigments were more likely to contain heavy metals — and at high concentrations.

The report says that of the 48 Halloween face paints tested, 21 had trace amounts of at least one heavy metal and some had as many as four. Lead was found in nearly 20 percent of the paints and cadmium in nearly 30 percent.

Lead is linked to learning disabilities and developmental problems in children and cadmium is linked to breast, kidney, lung and prostate cancers, according to the report.

No Regulation On Makeup. 

So, how and why are these harmful products permitted in face paint, even though lead has been banned in regulated products like house paint for decades?

Unfortunately make-up is not regulated. The law does not require cosmetic products and ingredients, other than color additives, to have FDA approval before they go on the market.

Therefore the consequences of lead exposure are serious and rampant. The California Department of Public Health Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch website states that lead poisoning can harm a child’s nervous system and brain when they are still forming.

  • Lead can lead to a low blood count (anemia).
  • Small amounts of lead in the body can make it hard for children to learn, pay attention, and succeed in school.
  • Higher amounts of lead exposure can damage the nervous system, kidneys, and other major organs. Very high exposure can lead to seizures or death.

Halloween face paint

The Safest Options.

Since all of the v contained lead, and none of the metals they found were listed on the ingredient labels, the CSC actually recommends avoiding Halloween face paint altogether until safety standards are put in place. CSC urges parents that, if they do choose to use face paint, they keep it away from kids’ mouths and hands so they don’t ingest it.

  • Go Natural: Homemade is the way. Make your own dyes and colors. The CSC has provided some DIY recipes using food or natural food coloring on their website.
  • “Say No” To Paint Kits: Don’t use paint kits. Professional face paint is actually cosmetic makeup that is made with ingredients that are safe for use on the skin. Halloween face paint kits often contain dyes or color additives that are not FDA-compliant. Never use craft paint, acrylic paint, markers or pens on the skin, which can cause an allergic reaction and can be very difficult to remove. Use cosmetic makeup products will come off easily using only soap and water.
  • Do a Patch Test (Skin Allergy): Patch testing may help to find the cause of allergic contact dermatitis.Whenever you use a new makeup product on yourself or your child, you should always do a patch test to check for sensitivity. “Non-toxic” doesn’t mean it won’t cause a skin reaction. Take a small amount of the product and apply it on the inside of your elbow. Watch for any kind of immediate reaction after about 20 minutes or so.
  • Wash Off With Soap & Water: Most of the times face paint products wash off with mild soap and water. For best results, remove with a high quality baby wipe or baby shampoo, water and a wash cloth. Avoid using low cost baby wipes, as these can be irritating to young children’s skin.
  • Moisturize Your Skin Post-Removal To Avoid Irritation: To reduce your chances of any skin irritation, breakout or redness, Alice and Pressler believe that it’s best to prepare you face and body before even applying the paint to begin with. Make sure that the makeup is put on to clean, dry skin and steer clear of painting over any wounds or rashes.
  • Also be sure to include a smoothing on a gentle skin moisturizer post-removal. “You can use Olay, Burt’s Bees or something from a health foods store. If you’re skin is really irritated, try an ointment like Lucas PaPaw,”

Debunking The Myths About Your Skin

Six biggest myths about your skin care. (Advanced Dermatology Associates & Dr. Larry Jaeger)
Six Biggest Myths About Your Skin Care.
                                           (Advanced Dermatology Associates & Dr. Larry Jaeger)

How do you know the information and advice you get about your skin is true? Skin care product brands spend millions marketing their products. Your friends probably have as much medical knowledge as WebMD.

With so much misinformation out there, we’re Debunking 6 Biggest Myths About Your Skin Care.

Tanning is harmlessExposure to ultraviolet light, UVA or UVB, accounts for 90% of the symptoms of premature skin aging. Both UVA and UVB radiation can cause skin damage including wrinkles, lowered immunity against infection, aging skin disorders, and cancer.

Acne is caused by what you eatAcne is caused by overproduction of sebum (oil) and obstruction of the pores. The amount of sebum produced by the skin is regulated by hormones only, not food. This includes chocolate, greasy food, soda, and fast foods. These foods do not have any effect on the hormones that regulate sebum production.

Topical antioxidants reverse wrinklesFree radicals play an important role in creating wrinkles. Therefore, it makes sense that antioxidants will make skin more youthful. Unfortunately, there are no good scientific studies that show what type of topical antioxidant is effective. This research is being conducted now, but it is still too early. Right now the only topical product that has been proven to improve wrinkles is Retin-A.

“All-natural” skin care products are best: What exactly does “all-natural” mean? Unfortunately, this term can mean just about anything, and cosmetics companies use it any way they want. All cosmetics and skin care products have synthetic ingredients in them. Because a skin care product is made from a plant does not mean that it is better for the skin than a product created in a lab.

Expensive skin care products are better than inexpensive ones: The cost of a skin care product or cosmetic is absolutely NOT an indicator of effectiveness. The consumer industry would like people to believe that more expensive product have some special ingredient in it that makes it more effective. However, there are many products in every category that are effective and don’t come with a high price tag. “Retinol is one of them—so much science has been done on the value of it. Vitamin C and Vitamin A, have all been proven by science to work.

Men don’t have as many skin problems as women: Untrue, men wrinkle as much as women and they get skin conditions such as acne, seborrhea, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis just like women. Men also have additional concerns surrounding facial hair. It can be argued that men don’t use sunscreen and protect their skin properly.

 

What’s Causing Your Acne?

What’s Causing Your Acne?Whats-Causing-Your-Acne

Thought you’d waved goodbye to those pimples in your teens? Think again.

Adult acne is on the rise, with one recent study revealing that more than 25% of women in their 40s and 15% of women in their 50s suffer from embarrassing and painful break-outs.

Acne is caused when an excess of the skin’s natural oil (sebum) combines with dead skin cells to block the pores. These blocked pores can then become infected by bacteria that feeds on sebum.

In just the same way that hormones wreak havoc on our skin during the teenage years so, too, are they the main culprit as we hit middle age. This is because testosterone triggers higher sebum production, and as we get older, we produce less estrogen to balance our body’s production of testosterone. Cue more unsightly blemishes.

Acne Develops From Stress On the Skin.

Acne specialist Dr Stefanie Williams says: “Adult acne is at epidemic levels. Increased stress caused by the pace of work and modern life, can all cause or aggravate acne.”

But there are also many other, lesser known, triggers that help unwelcome acne spots to appear.

Clearer-Skin-Care-Acne-Tips

Causes of Adult Acne?

Nasty workout gear & yoga mats:

PROBLEM: Your workout is great for your body, but could be terrible for your skin, especially on your back, chest and shoulders. This is because of “acne mechanica” or “friction acne” as it’s otherwise known, which occurs when tight clothing or straps hold sweat against the skin. The irritation increases sebum production in pores, which leads to whiteheads, blackheads and pimples.

So the helmet you’ve worn while you’re cycling; your sports bra strap or even your tight gym top could all be making your skin break out.

Also watch out for your yoga mat. Bacteria from the floor, feet and sweat can accumulate and transfer to your face.

In a 2012 study from the New York University School of Medicine, gym surfaces were found to be infected with a bacterium that can cause acne, boils and folliculitis. Folliculitis is an infection of the hair follicles which causes a nasty acne-like attack of red spots.

Acne Prevention Tip:

First, put a clean towel over your gym or yoga mat when you work out. Wipe down equipment before use. Ensure your gym kit is clean and made of breathable “wickable” materials that hold moisture away from your body.

If you prefer natural fabrics, look for bamboo and cotton mixes which do the same. Make sure nothing’s too tight so sweat doesn’t get trapped and the skin isn’t irritated. Have several sports bras of different styles and use a different one each time so you don’t get rubbing in the same place.

Afterwards, always shower to remove sweat and bacteria, and put on clean clothes. If your acne is painful, see your dermatologist. If it is itchy, ask for anti-fungal treatments and use an anti-dandruff shampoo as a body wash in the shower.

Is Your Shampoo Causing Acne?

Oily shampoos

PROBLEM: Acne caused by oily shampoos, conditioners and styling products is so common, it has its own name: “pomade acne”.

Cosmetic dermatologist Dr Rachael Eckel says: “As they are rinsed out in the shower, oily, rich shampoos and conditioners drip over the forehead, shoulders and back, causing acne.

“They can also cause folliculitis, the itchy, acne-like outbreak of spots, on the upper back.”

Greasy hair-styling products can do the same as they tend to transfer from the hair to the skin, especially around the hairline, blocking pores and irritating skin. This is even more likely if you have a fringe, perhaps cut to cover spots in the first place.

Acne Prevention Tip:

Wash and condition your hair at the beginning of your shower and rinse immediately. Then tie your hair up and wash your face and body to remove any oil left behind.

“I encourage patients who are breaking out in new areas, like the forehead or temples, to double-check their hair care products for oily and pore-clogging ingredients like coconut oil, and eliminate them,” says cosmetic surgeon Dr Sam Bunting.

Avoid hair oils completely if you are acne-prone. Try a light, oil-free shampoo.

Acne & Harsh Anti-Ageing CreamCauses of Adult Acne?-Tips-Skincare-Solutionss

PROBLEM: The pressure to stay looking young means skincare creams can be too intensive, too rich or too unsuited to many women’s skin.

“Women today are much more concerned about anti-ageing,” says Dr Williams. “However, often these creams are far too heavy for their skin type and end up blocking pores and causing acne.”

Acne Prevention Tip:

If you have oily skin or acne, avoid putting anything with oil on your face, especially almond oil, apricot kernel oil and oleic acid — a fatty acid found in olive and grape seed oil.

Beware of heavy, pore-blocking — and, therefore, acne-causing —ingredients such as lanolin and cocoa butter particularly if they’re one of the main ingredients.

But beware of the moisturizing agents like Isopropyl isostearate and Isopropyl myristate, used to make cosmetics “feel creamy”.

Try lotions which tackle both ageing and acne.

Drinking Skimmed Equals More Acne

Skim Milk Causing Acne Outbreak

PROBLEM: If you eat a lot of bread and pasta and have swapped full-fat milk for skimmed, you could be damaging your skin.

“As you hit your 40s and 50s, you can become insulin-resistant, which means your body is less able to metabolize sugar,” says Dr Williams. “Starchy foods such as bread and pasta are broken down in the body so they are indistinguishable from liquid sugar. High blood sugar stimulates insulin which can worsen inflamed acne.”

Milk may also be troublesome. While all types of milk are linked with increased acne, a 2007 study found skimmed is the worst.

Women who drank the equivalent of two or more glasses of skimmed milk per day were 22 percent more likely to develop ordinary acne, and 44 percent more likely to develop cystic acne, which causes painful, large and deep spots that don’t come to a head.

Why? Nobody is sure, but it is likely to be because milk contains hormones which can cause an imbalance in human hormones.

The key culprit may be insulin-like growth factor-1, or IGF-1, a natural hormone which seems to increase skin cell growth in the lining of the pores, which then become blocked.

It’s thought that processing milk by removing fat may remove the hormone estrogen which is stored in fat and protects against the male hormones that cause acne.

Acne Prevention Tip:

Stick to a low GI diet — which is rich in high-fiber foods which release sugar slowly into the blood stream, thereby keeping blood glucose levels steady. Also switch to unsweetened almond milk which does not contain hormones.

Cutting out sugar and all starchy, grain-based foods, including bread, pasta, and breakfast cereals. Instead, eating unprocessed protein such as fish, meat and eggs, lots of vegetables and fruit in moderation.

Remember the natural process of fermentation in yogurt breaks down IGF-1, so full-fat yogurt is less likely to trigger acne.

Acne From Washing Your Face Too Much?

PROBLEM: When prone to break-outs, many women try to desperately scrub away oil and sebum build-up. But this can make matters worse.

Cosmetic doctor Mervyn Patterson says the wrong cleansers will dry the skin, causing acne. This is because healthy skin is protected by the “acid mantle”, a fine, slightly acidic film on the surface.

Acne-causing bacteria cannot thrive in an acid environment, but if the skin surface is disrupted by excessive cleansing, the skin becomes alkaline, allowing the bacteria to flourish. This is a particular problem for older women because collagen loss makes their skin thinner, more fragile and naturally less acidic.

“Alkaline soaps and harsh cleansers can easily disturb older skin’s natural barrier,” explains Dr Patterson. “Frequent exfoliation either with abrasive scrubs or harsh acid peels are also damaging and make skin inflamed and sensitive.”

This means that the kind of acne treatments teenagers use to banish their blemishes may simply cause inflammation, redness and soreness in older women.

Acne Prevention Tip:

Avoid soap and foaming cleansers containing sodium lauryl sulfate or sodium laureth sulfate, ingredients that break down oil, but can also damage the skin barrier. Instead, use a gentle wash off cleanser.

Most Cosmetic dermatologists, as Lawrence Jaeger; recommend: “Washing your face no more than twice daily for about 40 to 60 seconds, which is enough time to ensure it’s clean without stripping it.”

Acne Treatment – Sensitive Skin

Acne and Sensitive Skin

Acne and Sensitive Skin

Lawrence Jaeger is an expert Dermatologist and treats patients with Acne and sensitive skin at Advanced Dermatology Associates in New York City.

Acne Skin Care Treatment

Acne may be treated with a combination of remedies including over-the-counter skin care, acne medications, and chemical or laser procedures. Learn safe ways to banish blackheads, whiteheads, and cystic acne, and get the clear skin you want. Most people develop acne — the most common skin condition — to some degree, but it primarily affects teenagers undergoing hormonal changes.

Acne may be mild (few, occasional pimples), moderate (inflammatory papules), or severe (nodules and cysts). Treatment depends on the severity of the condition.

Treatment-Acne-affects-sensitive-skin-care-stats

Acne is the most common skin disorder in the United States, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. It affects 40 to 50 million Americans and almost 85% of people will get some form of acne during their lives. Many clients with acne may also be experiencing sensitive skin issues—skin care professionals need to take steps to alter typical treatments used to treat acne for specialized treatment of this group of clients.

For those with sensitive skin, acne can be much more inflamed than it tends to be for those without sensitive skin. The initial intake form should attempt to pinpoint where acne is coming from—based on that, the skin care professional should utilize facial protocols and establish a home-care regimen.

Value of the Patient Intake Form

Both internal and external inflammation can play a role in sensitive acne. The intake form is very important in getting the whole story from the client.

Internal inflammation. Asking the right questions will help determine why the acne possibly started.

Has the client had acne for a long time or is this something new? Depending on the cause, the breakouts could be a short- or long-term issue. Acne outbreaks occur in a variety of age groups—it is not just a typical problem for teenagers. Menstrual cycles can begin in young girls as early as 8-years-old and breakouts are extremely irritating for their delicate skin.