Category Archives: STDs

STD Protection – STI/STD Treatment Tips

STI/STD Treatment Tips

STI/STD Treatment Tips  –  STD/STI Treatment is Prevention.

What Can I Do To Protect Myself?STI/STD Treatment Tips - Some STDs/STIs are asymptotic. Meaning no symptoms!

  • The surest way to protect yourself against STDs is to not have sex. That means not having any vaginal, anal, or oral sex (“abstinence”). There are many things to consider before having sex, and it’s okay to say “no” if you don’t want to have sex.
  • If you do decide to have sex, you and your partner should get tested beforehand and make sure that you and your partner use a condom—every time you have oral, anal, or vaginal sex, from start to finish. Know where to get condoms and how to use them correctly. It is not safe to stop using condoms unless you’ve both been tested, know your status, and are in a mutually monogamous relationship.
  • Mutual monogamy means that you and your partner both agree to only have sexual contact with each other. This can help protect against STDs, as long as you’ve both been tested and know you’re STD-free.
  • Before you have sex, talk with your partner about how you will prevent STDs and pregnancy. If you think you’re ready to have sex, you need to be ready to protect your body and your future. You should also talk to your partner ahead of time about what you will and will not do sexually. Your partner should always respect your right to say no to anything that doesn’t feel right.
  • Make sure you get the health care you need. Ask a doctor or nurse about STD testing and about vaccines against HPV and hepatitis B.
  • Girls and young women may have extra needs to protect their reproductive health. Talk to your doctor or nurse about regular cervical cancer screening and chlamydia testing. You may also want to discuss unintended pregnancy and birth control.
  • Avoid using alcohol and drugs. If you use alcohol and drugs, you are more likely to take risks, like not using a condom or having sex with someone you normally wouldn’t have sex with.

If I Get an STD, How Will I Know?

Many STDs don’t cause any symptoms that you would notice, so the only way to know for sure if you have an STD is to get tested. You can get an STD from having sex with someone who has no symptoms. Just like you, that person might not even know he or she has an STD.

Can STDs Be Treated?STI/STD Treatment Tips - STD increase in US substantially

Your doctor can prescribe medicines to cure some STDs, like chlamydia and gonorrhea. Other STDs, like herpes, can’t be cured, but you can take medicine to help with the symptoms.

If you are ever treated for an STD, be sure to finish all of your medicine, even if you feel better before you finish it all. Ask the doctor or nurse about testing and treatment for your partner, too. You and your partner should avoid having sex until you’ve both been treated. Otherwise, you may continue to pass the STD back and forth. It is possible to get an STD again (after you’ve been treated), if you have sex with someone who has an STD.

What Happens If I Don’t Treat an STD?

Some curable STDs can be dangerous if they aren’t treated. For example, if left untreated, chlamydia and gonorrhea can make it difficult—or even impossible—for a woman to get pregnant. You also increase your chances of getting HIV if you have an untreated STD. Some STDs, like HIV, can be fatal if left untreated.

What If My Partner or I Have an Incurable STD?

Some STDs- like herpes and HIV- aren’t curable, but a doctor can prescribe medicine to treat the symptoms.

If you are living with an STD, it’s important to tell your partner before you have sex. Although it may be uncomfortable to talk about your STD, open and honest conversation can help your partner make informed decisions to protect his or her health.

Where Can I Get Tested?

Central Park Medical Associates – SAME-DAY STD TESTING & TREATMENT, HIV RESULTS IN 15 MINUTES

Our doctors and medical providers have over 100 years of combined experience in this highly sub-specialized area of medicine and are the true experts in this field. Our high standards have allowed us to obtain a C.L.I.A approved and certified on-site laboratory to give you the answers you need while you wait. Your name, identity and results are all protected by law, therefore guaranteeing you total privacy. We do not need your full name when testing, which further guarantees true anonymity.

There are also places that offer teen-friendly, confidential, and free STD tests. This means that no one has to find out you’ve been tested. Visit GetTested to find an STD testing location near you.

If I Have Questions, Who Can Answer Them?

If you have questions, talk to a parent or other trusted adult. Don’t be afraid to be open and honest with them about your concerns. If you’re ever confused or need advice, they’re the first place to start. Remember, they were young once, too.

Talking about sex with a parent or another adult doesn’t need to be a one-time conversation. It’s best to leave the door open for conversations in the future.

It’s also important to talk honestly with a doctor or nurse. Ask which STD tests and vaccines they recommend for you.

Differences Between Anal Warts, Hemorrhoids & Anal Fissures

One of the most typical health conditions confused with hemorrhoids is anal warts. They are sorta the same… yet they stem from entirely different causes and therefore are treated in very different methods. Anal warts are caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). This virus is highly contagious and often transmitted through sexual intercourse or skin-to-skin contact. An anal fissure is a small tear in the thin, moist tissue (mucosa) that lines the anus.

The major distinction of course is the occurrence of pain.

ANAL PAINS & CONDITIONS: ANAL WARTS, HEMORRHOIDS OR FISSURE

What are Anal Warts?

Anal warts (also called “condyloma acuminata”) are a condition that affects the area around and inside the anus. They may also affect the skin of the genital area. They first appear as tiny spots or growths, perhaps as small as the head of a pin, and may grow quite large and cover the entire anal area. They usually appear as a flesh or brownish color. Usually, they do not cause pain or discomfort and patients may be unaware that the warts are present. Some patients will experience symptoms such as itching, bleeding, mucus discharge and/or a feeling of a lump or mass in the anal area. Anal warts are caused by HPV and can be transmitted by direct contact ie. basically any contact exposure to the anal area (hand contact, secretions from a sexual partner) can result in HPV infection .

HPV infection does not lead to hemorrhoids.

What are Anal Fissures?

An anal fissure is a small tear or crack in the lining of the anus. It may occur when passing large or hard stools, straining during childbirth, or experiencing bouts of diarrhea. An anal fissure is usually a minor condition that goes away within six weeks. Home treatments can help ease pain and promote healing.

Causes of Anal Fissure

Anal fissure can occur as a result of any circumstance that puts excessive pressure on the lining of the anus. Thus there are a variety of causes, which may include:

  • Constipation with large or impacted stools
  • Chronic or persistent diarrhea
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (e.g. Crohn’s disease)
  • Childbirth
  • Infections such as syphilis, herpes, HIV or tuberculosis
  • Cancer

What are Hemorrhoids?

On the other hand, are a very painful condition. Symptoms of hemorrhoids are anal itching, pain (especially while sitting), blood on stool, and lumps near the anus. Increased pressure in the veins of the anus causes hemorrhoids. This is why hemorrhoids are common during pregnancy and after childbirth.

Hemorrhoid symptoms may include finding bright red blood on your toilet paper or seeing blood in the toilet after a bowel movement. Other common symptoms include rectal pain, pressure, burning, and itching. You may also be able to feel a lump in your anal area.

Hemorrhoids are common and usually not too serious. They can often be treated with home remedies, and you may not even need to be seen by a doctor.

But some symptoms of hemorrhoids, especially rectal bleeding, may also be caused by other diseases, some of them serious, like colon cancer.

Treatment of Anal Conditions:

 

Anal Warts Screenings, Tests & Checks:

Anal warts and hemorrhoids can both seem like lumps or masses of tissue round the anal area. However, there are difference scan result in a proper identification upon near inspection of the area.

Anal warts testing demands that your doctor may inquire as to the presence or absence of risk factors to include a history of anal intercourse, a positive HIV test or a chronically weakened immune system (medications for organ transplant patients, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, etc).

Anal warts’ physical examination should focus primarily on the anorectal examination and evaluation of the perineum (pelvic region) that includes the penile or vaginal area to look for warts.  Digital rectal examination should be performed to rule out any mass.  Anoscopy is typically performed to look within the anal canal for additional warts.  This involves inserting a small instrument about the size of a finger into your anus to help visualize the area.  Speculum examination may also be performed to aid in vaginal examination in women.

Hemorrhoids Treatment & Care:

Hemorrhoids are usually best treated in your own home through a high-fiber diet, a proper amount of exercise, and easily obtained over-the-counter relief. Home remedies often work nicely on hemorrhoids and surgery is just rarely needed.

Hemorrhoids are often kept away by keeping the lifestyle changes that were made to assist cure them.

You should seek treatment for hemorrhoid symptoms if:

  • You have rectal bleeding for the first time.
  • You have heavy rectal bleeding.
  • You have rectal bleeding that is not responding to home care.
  • You have other hemorrhoid symptoms, such as pain, pressure, itching, and burning, that do not respond to home care after a few days.
  • You have hemorrhoid symptoms along with other symptoms such as fever, weight loss, abdominal pain, or a change in bowel habits.

Anal Warts Treatment:

Anal warts, however, always have to be handled surgically, usually on an outpatient foundation. The warts will not go away by themselves. Instead, a physician has to make use of liquid nitrogen to freeze all of them off.

If warts are not removed, they can grow larger and multiply. Left untreated, warts may lead to an increased risk of anal cancer in the affected area. Internal anal warts may not respond to topical medications, so surgery may be required.

Anal warts will frequently come back for no cause under your control, because the virus can reside dormant in your skin cells for a long period. Post-treatment care and doctor’s supervision are often stressed to minimize chances of future outbreaks. When warts come back, they can usually be treated at your surgeon’s office. If a large number of new warts develop quickly, surgery may be needed again.

Treatment options for anal warts include:

  • Topical medication: These creams usually work best if the warts are very small and located only on the skin around the anus.
  • Topical medications that will freeze the warts (liquid nitrogen)
  • Topical medications that will burn the warts (Trichlorocetic acid, podophyllin)
  • Surgery: When the warts are either too large for the above mentioned treatments or are internal, surgery is considered. During surgery, the warts are surgically removed. The patient will be anesthetized for the procedure. The type of anesthetic depends on the number and exact location of the warts being removed. When there are many warts, your surgeon may perform the surgery in stages.
  • An internal examination will also be performed so that any lesions on the inside can also be found and treated.

Differences Between Anal Warts and Hemorrhoids

STI, STD Infection – 10 Symptoms Not To Ignore

STD’s/STI’s are common.  An STI is a sexually transmitted infection, and an STD is a sexually transmitted disease. There are about 20 million new cases of STD’s in the U.S. each year. More than half of adults will have one in their lifetime. If you haven’t been tested, you could pass an STD on to someone else. Even though you don’t have symptoms, it can be dangerous to your health and the health of your partner.

By taking special notice of the symptoms that your body is sending you will offer your medical doctor the necessary precautions related to testing and treating the right STI or STD.

STI or STD Infection – 10 Symptoms You May Be Infected.

Some STI’s/STD’s, including chlamydia and gonorrhea, can cause infertility. This is especially true for women. These diseases can cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), an infection of the uterus and other reproductive organs. PID can raise a woman’s risk for ectopic pregnancy, a pregnancy outside the womb.

Other STDs, such as syphilis and HIV, can be deadly. Left untreated for years, syphilis can also seriously damage your brain, nervous system, and heart.

Certain strains of HPV can cause cervical cancer in women, cancer of the penis in men, and cancer of the anus in both men and women. In addition, genital and anal warts are also highly contagious associated infections of HPV.

STD/STI Testing

Different STD’s have different tests. “It is important to discuss the types of sexual activities you have had. That will direct the doctor in which test to use,” Klausner says. You may need to give a blood or urine sample, or get swabs from your genital areas or mouth.

IF YOU CONCERNED THAT YOU’VE RECENTLY CONTACTED A SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTION OR DISEASE; YOUR DOCTOR SHOULD CHECK ALL POTENTIALLY EXPOSED SITES. IF YOU’VE HAD ANAL SEX, YOUR DOCTOR SHOULD CHECK YOUR RECTUM. IF YOU’VE HAD ORAL SEX, YOUR DOCTOR SHOULD CHECK YOUR THROAT. HOWEVER, THERE ARE ALSO SOME SWAB TESTS YOU CAN DO YOURSELF.

Never assume that your doctor automatically checks for STI’s or STD’s when you visit. “Just because you are getting a Pap smear [or blood test], that doesn’t mean you are getting tested for everything,” he says. “You have to ask which test you are getting. If you’re worried and you think you need a test, ask for it.”

STI, STD Infection – 10 Symptoms Not To Ignore

STI, STD Infection - 10 Symptoms Not To Ignore

LUMPS AND BUMPS

Any lumps, bumps or sores surrounding your nether-regions may be bad news.

While often any lumpy areas may be completely harmless, caused by heat or by an ingrown hair, it is important to know when to check any problem areas out.

If you notice that your swelling looks wart-like or feels rough to the touch, you may have contracted a strain of genital warts.

On the flip-side, if the lump is soft and looks similar to a spot or a pimple, it is probably just an ingrown hair.

Swollen testicles are another sign of potential STD/STI’s in men.

If any sores or blisters erupt around your genitals or in/around your mouth, it may sound obvious but you should get to the doctors as soon as you are able – as this indicates you could have contracted herpes.

PAIN

Listen to your body – if you ever feel a consistent pain in your tummy it is important not to ignore it.

Abdominal pain (or even testicles pain for men) that is continuous can indicate gonorrhea, chlamydia and trichomoniasis.

Pain during sexual intercourse in women. Pain felt during sex should also not be ignored – go to your doctor to get diagnosed as soon as you can.

CHANGES IN URINATION

Painful urination.

Burning or feeling pain when you wee can be a symptom of several STD’s, including herpes, chlamydia, gonorrhoea and trichomoniasis – as well as urinary tract infections, bladder infections, or kidney stones.

Because of this, it’s important to get checked-out if you ever have pain, or any other strange sensations, when you go for a wee.

And if you ever notice blood in your urine – get yourself to the doctors ASAP.

DISCHARGE

While discharge is perfectly natural for women, it has the potential to be serious. It all comes down to the color of the discharge.

If your discharge looks a green or yellow hue this it may be down to gonorrhea.

Any thick, white, or smelly discharge is also to be looked out for – and if it keeps happening should warrant a trip to the doctors.

Men experiencing discharge from their penis should also take heed.

While a discharge doesn’t necessarily mean you have an STD, it’s well worth getting any changes taken a look at.

ITCHING

While some itchy red patches can be harmless and may be down to eczema or a heat rash, any rashes or itching around your groin area is worth getting checked.

BLEEDING IRREGULARLY

This is a symptom more common in women than men is one of the big ones not to be swept under the rug.

If you’re bleeding irregularly or often it could mean an infection or possibly even cancer.

While, in women, irregular bleeding can happen naturally every now and then, it is important that you visit the GP should it become a regular occurrence.

Also, if you’re persistently bleeding after sex you should get yourself checked.

FEVERS, CHILLS, SORE THROAT & WEIGHT LOSS

You have a fever when your temperature rises above its normal range. What’s normal for you may be a little higher or lower than the average normal temperature of 98.6 F (37 C).

Depending on what’s causing your fever, additional fever signs and symptoms may include:

  • Sweating (including night sweats)
  • Shivering
  • Headache
  • Muscle aches
  • Loss of appetite
  • Dehydration
  • General weakness

Fevers by themselves may not be a cause for alarm — or a reason to call a doctor. However, when accompanied by additional symptoms of sore throat, headache, malaise, and weight loss – you should immediately see a doctor.

CDC says STD rates increasing

Dr. Lawrence Jaeger provides testing and treatment for all forms of STDs at Advanced Dermatology Associates in New York City

The Center for Disease Control estimates that nearly 20 million new sexually transmitted infections occur every year in the United States.

And half are among young people ages 15 to 24.

“When we look at things across the board from STD’s, we actually come out pretty much at the bottom,” said Dr. Terry Frankovich, Medical Director for the Marquette County Health Department.

Both young men and young women are heavily affected by STDs – but young women face the most serious long-term

health consequences.

The CDC estimates that undiagnosed STDs cause 24,000 women to become infertile each year.

“The highest reported STD in the country right now is Chlamydia, and the campus of Northern Michigan University, there’s no exception to that,” said Adam Burri, a Registered Nurse at the Vielmetti Health Center on Northern Michigan University’s Campus.

Dr. Lawrence Jaeger notes One big issue is the lack of symptoms with STDs such as chlamydia.

“Patients, they won’t have any symptoms at all. There’s screening recommendations for women 25 and under on a yearly basis, so oftentimes those are usually the cases that we find,” said Burri.

But there’s also a rising trend according to CDC data…with gay and bisexual men.

Data shows that men who have sex with men account for 75 percent of all primary and secondary syphilis cases.

Primary and secondary syphilis are the most infectious stages, and if not adequately treated, can lead to visual impairment and stroke.

Syphilis infection can also place a person at increased risk for acquiring or transmitting HIV infection.

“The best thing that these numbers can do is to help us identify things that are changeable in the community,” said Frankovich.

Over all increases since 2011 include a 0.7 percent increase for Chlamydia, 4 percent increase in Gonorrhea cases, and an 11 percent increase in primary and secondary cases of Syphilis, which was solely among men.

The CDC and Dr. Lawrence Jaeger recommend a yearly exam for both men and women to screen for STDs since most can go undetected with few or no symptoms.

Know the Symptoms of STDs

Lawrence Jaeger is an expert Medical Dermatologist in New York City and provides testing and treatment for patients exhibiting symptoms of STDs

No matter if you’re gay, married or single, or if you have sex, you may have a sexually transmitted disease (STD) with subtle or noticeable symptoms.

Although condoms are highly effective for reducing transmission of STDs, no method is foolproof.

STD symptoms aren’t always obvious. Some STDs can be treated easily and eliminated, but others require more involved, long-term treatment.

It’s essential to be evaluated, and — if diagnosed with an STD, also known as a sexually transmitted infection (STI) — get treated. Any partners must be informed as well so that they can be evaluated and treated.

If untreated, STDs can increase your risk of acquiring another STD because it can stimulate an immune response in the genital area or cause sores. Some untreated STDs can also lead to infertility.

STIs Often Are Asymptomatic

You could have an STI and be asymptomatic — without any signs or symptoms. In fact, this happens with a lot of STIs. Even though you have no symptoms, you’re still at risk of passing the infection along to your sex partners. That’s why it’s important to use protection, such as a condom, during sex and visit your doctor on a regular basis for STI screening, so you can identify a potential infection and get treated for it before passing it along to someone else.

Some of the following diseases, such as hepatitis, can be transmitted without sexual contact. Others, such as gonorrhea, can only be transmitted through sexual contact.

Hepatitis Symptoms

Hepatitis A, B and C are all contagious viral infections that affect your liver. Hepatitis B and C are the most serious of the three, but each can cause your liver to become inflamed.

Some people never develop signs or symptoms. But for those who do, signs and symptoms may occur after several weeks and may include:

• Fatigue

• Nausea and vomiting

• Abdominal pain or discomfort, especially in the area of your liver on your right side beneath your lower ribs

• Loss of appetite

• Fever

• Dark urine

• Muscle or joint pain

• Itching

• Yellowing of your skin and the whites of your eyes (jaundice)

Gonorrhea Symptoms

Gonorrhea is a bacterial infection of the genital tract. The first gonorrhea symptoms generally appear within two to 10 days after exposure. However, some people may be infected for months before signs or symptoms occur. Signs and symptoms of gonorrhea may include:

• Thick, cloudy or bloody discharge from the penis or vagina

• Pain or burning sensation when urinating

• Abnormal menstrual bleeding

• Painful, swollen testicles

• Painful bowel movements

• Anal itching

Genital Herpes Symptoms

Genital herpes 0 is highly contagious and caused by a type of the herpes simplex virus (HSV). HSV enters your body through small breaks in your skin or mucous membranes. Most people with HSV never know they have it, because they have no signs or symptoms. The signs and symptoms of HSV can be so mild they go unnoticed. When signs and symptoms are noticeable, the first episode is generally the worst. Some people never experience a second episode. Other people, however, can experience recurrent episodes over a period of decades.

When present, genital herpes signs and symptoms may include:

• Small, red bumps, blisters (vesicles) or open sores (ulcers) in the genital, anal and nearby areas

• Pain or itching around the genital area, buttocks and inner thighs

The initial symptom of genital herpes usually is pain or itching, beginning within a few weeks after exposure to an infected sexual partner. After several days, small, red bumps may appear. They then rupture, becoming ulcers that ooze or bleed. Eventually, scabs form and the ulcers heal.

In women, sores can erupt in the vaginal area, external genitals, buttocks, anus or cervix. In men, sores can appear on the penis, scrotum, buttocks, anus or thighs, or inside the urethra, the tube from the bladder through the penis.

While you have ulcers, it may be painful to urinate. You may also experience pain and tenderness in your genital area until the infection clears. During an initial episode, you may have flu-like signs and symptoms, such as headache, muscle aches and fever, as well as swollen lymph nodes in your groin.

In some cases, the infection can be active and contagious even when sores aren’t present.

Genital warts (HPV infection) Symptoms

Genital warts, caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), are one of the most common types of STDs. The signs and symptoms of genital warts include:

• Small, flesh-colored or gray swellings in your genital area

• Several warts close together that take on a cauliflower shape

• Itching or discomfort in your genital area

• Bleeding with intercourse

Often, however, genital warts cause no symptoms. Genital warts may be as small as 1 millimeter in diameter or may multiply into large clusters.

In women, genital warts can grow on the vulva, the walls of the vagina, the area between the external genitals and the anus, and the cervix. In men, they may occur on the tip or shaft of the penis, the scrotum, or the anus. Genital warts can also develop in the mouth or throat of a person who has had oral sex with an infected person.

Chlamydia Symptoms

Chlamydia is a bacterial infection of your genital tract. Chlamydia may be difficult for you to detect because early-stage infections often cause few or no signs and symptoms. When they do occur, they usually start one to three weeks after you’ve been exposed to chlamydia. Even when signs and symptoms do occur, they’re often mild and passing, making them easy to overlook.

Signs and symptoms may include:

• Painful urination

• Lower abdominal pain

• Vaginal discharge

• Discharge from the penis

• Pain during sexual intercourse in women

• Testicular pain

Trichomoniasis symptoms

Trichomoniasis is a common STI caused by a microscopic, one-celled parasite called Trichomonas vaginalis. This organism spreads during sexual intercourse. The organism usually infects the urinary tract in men, but often causes no symptoms in men. Trichomoniasis typically infects the vagina in women. When trichomoniasis causes symptoms, they may range from mild irritation to severe inflammation. Signs and symptoms may include:

• Clear, white, greenish or yellowish vaginal discharge

• Discharge from the penis

• Strong vaginal odor

• Vaginal itching or irritation

• Itching or irritation inside the penis

• Pain during sexual intercourse

• Painful urination

If you suspect you have these or other STIs or that you may have been exposed to one, see your doctor for STI testing. Timely diagnosis and treatment are important to avoid or delay more-severe, potentially life-threatening health problems and to avoid infecting others.