STI, STD Infection – 10 Symptoms Not To Ignore

STD’s/STI’s are common.  An STI is a sexually transmitted infection, and an STD is a sexually transmitted disease. There are about 20 million new cases of STD’s in the U.S. each year. More than half of adults will have one in their lifetime. If you haven’t been tested, you could pass an STD on to someone else. Even though you don’t have symptoms, it can be dangerous to your health and the health of your partner.

By taking special notice of the symptoms that your body is sending you will offer your medical doctor the necessary precautions related to testing and treating the right STI or STD.

STI or STD Infection – 10 Symptoms You May Be Infected.

Some STI’s/STD’s, including chlamydia and gonorrhea, can cause infertility. This is especially true for women. These diseases can cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), an infection of the uterus and other reproductive organs. PID can raise a woman’s risk for ectopic pregnancy, a pregnancy outside the womb.

Other STDs, such as syphilis and HIV, can be deadly. Left untreated for years, syphilis can also seriously damage your brain, nervous system, and heart.

Certain strains of HPV can cause cervical cancer in women, cancer of the penis in men, and cancer of the anus in both men and women. In addition, genital and anal warts are also highly contagious associated infections of HPV.

STD/STI Testing

Different STD’s have different tests. “It is important to discuss the types of sexual activities you have had. That will direct the doctor in which test to use,” Klausner says. You may need to give a blood or urine sample, or get swabs from your genital areas or mouth.

IF YOU CONCERNED THAT YOU’VE RECENTLY CONTACTED A SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTION OR DISEASE; YOUR DOCTOR SHOULD CHECK ALL POTENTIALLY EXPOSED SITES. IF YOU’VE HAD ANAL SEX, YOUR DOCTOR SHOULD CHECK YOUR RECTUM. IF YOU’VE HAD ORAL SEX, YOUR DOCTOR SHOULD CHECK YOUR THROAT. HOWEVER, THERE ARE ALSO SOME SWAB TESTS YOU CAN DO YOURSELF.

Never assume that your doctor automatically checks for STI’s or STD’s when you visit. “Just because you are getting a Pap smear [or blood test], that doesn’t mean you are getting tested for everything,” he says. “You have to ask which test you are getting. If you’re worried and you think you need a test, ask for it.”

STI, STD Infection – 10 Symptoms Not To Ignore

STI, STD Infection - 10 Symptoms Not To Ignore

LUMPS AND BUMPS

Any lumps, bumps or sores surrounding your nether-regions may be bad news.

While often any lumpy areas may be completely harmless, caused by heat or by an ingrown hair, it is important to know when to check any problem areas out.

If you notice that your swelling looks wart-like or feels rough to the touch, you may have contracted a strain of genital warts.

On the flip-side, if the lump is soft and looks similar to a spot or a pimple, it is probably just an ingrown hair.

Swollen testicles are another sign of potential STD/STI’s in men.

If any sores or blisters erupt around your genitals or in/around your mouth, it may sound obvious but you should get to the doctors as soon as you are able – as this indicates you could have contracted herpes.

PAIN

Listen to your body – if you ever feel a consistent pain in your tummy it is important not to ignore it.

Abdominal pain (or even testicles pain for men) that is continuous can indicate gonorrhea, chlamydia and trichomoniasis.

Pain during sexual intercourse in women. Pain felt during sex should also not be ignored – go to your doctor to get diagnosed as soon as you can.

CHANGES IN URINATION

Painful urination.

Burning or feeling pain when you wee can be a symptom of several STD’s, including herpes, chlamydia, gonorrhoea and trichomoniasis – as well as urinary tract infections, bladder infections, or kidney stones.

Because of this, it’s important to get checked-out if you ever have pain, or any other strange sensations, when you go for a wee.

And if you ever notice blood in your urine – get yourself to the doctors ASAP.

DISCHARGE

While discharge is perfectly natural for women, it has the potential to be serious. It all comes down to the color of the discharge.

If your discharge looks a green or yellow hue this it may be down to gonorrhea.

Any thick, white, or smelly discharge is also to be looked out for – and if it keeps happening should warrant a trip to the doctors.

Men experiencing discharge from their penis should also take heed.

While a discharge doesn’t necessarily mean you have an STD, it’s well worth getting any changes taken a look at.

ITCHING

While some itchy red patches can be harmless and may be down to eczema or a heat rash, any rashes or itching around your groin area is worth getting checked.

BLEEDING IRREGULARLY

This is a symptom more common in women than men is one of the big ones not to be swept under the rug.

If you’re bleeding irregularly or often it could mean an infection or possibly even cancer.

While, in women, irregular bleeding can happen naturally every now and then, it is important that you visit the GP should it become a regular occurrence.

Also, if you’re persistently bleeding after sex you should get yourself checked.

FEVERS, CHILLS, SORE THROAT & WEIGHT LOSS

You have a fever when your temperature rises above its normal range. What’s normal for you may be a little higher or lower than the average normal temperature of 98.6 F (37 C).

Depending on what’s causing your fever, additional fever signs and symptoms may include:

  • Sweating (including night sweats)
  • Shivering
  • Headache
  • Muscle aches
  • Loss of appetite
  • Dehydration
  • General weakness

Fevers by themselves may not be a cause for alarm — or a reason to call a doctor. However, when accompanied by additional symptoms of sore throat, headache, malaise, and weight loss – you should immediately see a doctor.