Category Archives: HPV/ Genital Warts

STD Protection – STI/STD Treatment Tips

STI/STD Treatment Tips

STI/STD Treatment Tips  –  STD/STI Treatment is Prevention.

What Can I Do To Protect Myself?STI/STD Treatment Tips - Some STDs/STIs are asymptotic. Meaning no symptoms!

  • The surest way to protect yourself against STDs is to not have sex. That means not having any vaginal, anal, or oral sex (“abstinence”). There are many things to consider before having sex, and it’s okay to say “no” if you don’t want to have sex.
  • If you do decide to have sex, you and your partner should get tested beforehand and make sure that you and your partner use a condom—every time you have oral, anal, or vaginal sex, from start to finish. Know where to get condoms and how to use them correctly. It is not safe to stop using condoms unless you’ve both been tested, know your status, and are in a mutually monogamous relationship.
  • Mutual monogamy means that you and your partner both agree to only have sexual contact with each other. This can help protect against STDs, as long as you’ve both been tested and know you’re STD-free.
  • Before you have sex, talk with your partner about how you will prevent STDs and pregnancy. If you think you’re ready to have sex, you need to be ready to protect your body and your future. You should also talk to your partner ahead of time about what you will and will not do sexually. Your partner should always respect your right to say no to anything that doesn’t feel right.
  • Make sure you get the health care you need. Ask a doctor or nurse about STD testing and about vaccines against HPV and hepatitis B.
  • Girls and young women may have extra needs to protect their reproductive health. Talk to your doctor or nurse about regular cervical cancer screening and chlamydia testing. You may also want to discuss unintended pregnancy and birth control.
  • Avoid using alcohol and drugs. If you use alcohol and drugs, you are more likely to take risks, like not using a condom or having sex with someone you normally wouldn’t have sex with.

If I Get an STD, How Will I Know?

Many STDs don’t cause any symptoms that you would notice, so the only way to know for sure if you have an STD is to get tested. You can get an STD from having sex with someone who has no symptoms. Just like you, that person might not even know he or she has an STD.

Can STDs Be Treated?STI/STD Treatment Tips - STD increase in US substantially

Your doctor can prescribe medicines to cure some STDs, like chlamydia and gonorrhea. Other STDs, like herpes, can’t be cured, but you can take medicine to help with the symptoms.

If you are ever treated for an STD, be sure to finish all of your medicine, even if you feel better before you finish it all. Ask the doctor or nurse about testing and treatment for your partner, too. You and your partner should avoid having sex until you’ve both been treated. Otherwise, you may continue to pass the STD back and forth. It is possible to get an STD again (after you’ve been treated), if you have sex with someone who has an STD.

What Happens If I Don’t Treat an STD?

Some curable STDs can be dangerous if they aren’t treated. For example, if left untreated, chlamydia and gonorrhea can make it difficult—or even impossible—for a woman to get pregnant. You also increase your chances of getting HIV if you have an untreated STD. Some STDs, like HIV, can be fatal if left untreated.

What If My Partner or I Have an Incurable STD?

Some STDs- like herpes and HIV- aren’t curable, but a doctor can prescribe medicine to treat the symptoms.

If you are living with an STD, it’s important to tell your partner before you have sex. Although it may be uncomfortable to talk about your STD, open and honest conversation can help your partner make informed decisions to protect his or her health.

Where Can I Get Tested?

Central Park Medical Associates – SAME-DAY STD TESTING & TREATMENT, HIV RESULTS IN 15 MINUTES

Our doctors and medical providers have over 100 years of combined experience in this highly sub-specialized area of medicine and are the true experts in this field. Our high standards have allowed us to obtain a C.L.I.A approved and certified on-site laboratory to give you the answers you need while you wait. Your name, identity and results are all protected by law, therefore guaranteeing you total privacy. We do not need your full name when testing, which further guarantees true anonymity.

There are also places that offer teen-friendly, confidential, and free STD tests. This means that no one has to find out you’ve been tested. Visit GetTested to find an STD testing location near you.

If I Have Questions, Who Can Answer Them?

If you have questions, talk to a parent or other trusted adult. Don’t be afraid to be open and honest with them about your concerns. If you’re ever confused or need advice, they’re the first place to start. Remember, they were young once, too.

Talking about sex with a parent or another adult doesn’t need to be a one-time conversation. It’s best to leave the door open for conversations in the future.

It’s also important to talk honestly with a doctor or nurse. Ask which STD tests and vaccines they recommend for you.

CDC says STD rates increasing

Dr. Lawrence Jaeger provides testing and treatment for all forms of STDs at Advanced Dermatology Associates in New York City

The Center for Disease Control estimates that nearly 20 million new sexually transmitted infections occur every year in the United States.

And half are among young people ages 15 to 24.

“When we look at things across the board from STD’s, we actually come out pretty much at the bottom,” said Dr. Terry Frankovich, Medical Director for the Marquette County Health Department.

Both young men and young women are heavily affected by STDs – but young women face the most serious long-term

health consequences.

The CDC estimates that undiagnosed STDs cause 24,000 women to become infertile each year.

“The highest reported STD in the country right now is Chlamydia, and the campus of Northern Michigan University, there’s no exception to that,” said Adam Burri, a Registered Nurse at the Vielmetti Health Center on Northern Michigan University’s Campus.

Dr. Lawrence Jaeger notes One big issue is the lack of symptoms with STDs such as chlamydia.

“Patients, they won’t have any symptoms at all. There’s screening recommendations for women 25 and under on a yearly basis, so oftentimes those are usually the cases that we find,” said Burri.

But there’s also a rising trend according to CDC data…with gay and bisexual men.

Data shows that men who have sex with men account for 75 percent of all primary and secondary syphilis cases.

Primary and secondary syphilis are the most infectious stages, and if not adequately treated, can lead to visual impairment and stroke.

Syphilis infection can also place a person at increased risk for acquiring or transmitting HIV infection.

“The best thing that these numbers can do is to help us identify things that are changeable in the community,” said Frankovich.

Over all increases since 2011 include a 0.7 percent increase for Chlamydia, 4 percent increase in Gonorrhea cases, and an 11 percent increase in primary and secondary cases of Syphilis, which was solely among men.

The CDC and Dr. Lawrence Jaeger recommend a yearly exam for both men and women to screen for STDs since most can go undetected with few or no symptoms.

Know the Symptoms of STDs

Lawrence Jaeger is an expert Medical Dermatologist in New York City and provides testing and treatment for patients exhibiting symptoms of STDs

No matter if you’re gay, married or single, or if you have sex, you may have a sexually transmitted disease (STD) with subtle or noticeable symptoms.

Although condoms are highly effective for reducing transmission of STDs, no method is foolproof.

STD symptoms aren’t always obvious. Some STDs can be treated easily and eliminated, but others require more involved, long-term treatment.

It’s essential to be evaluated, and — if diagnosed with an STD, also known as a sexually transmitted infection (STI) — get treated. Any partners must be informed as well so that they can be evaluated and treated.

If untreated, STDs can increase your risk of acquiring another STD because it can stimulate an immune response in the genital area or cause sores. Some untreated STDs can also lead to infertility.

STIs Often Are Asymptomatic

You could have an STI and be asymptomatic — without any signs or symptoms. In fact, this happens with a lot of STIs. Even though you have no symptoms, you’re still at risk of passing the infection along to your sex partners. That’s why it’s important to use protection, such as a condom, during sex and visit your doctor on a regular basis for STI screening, so you can identify a potential infection and get treated for it before passing it along to someone else.

Some of the following diseases, such as hepatitis, can be transmitted without sexual contact. Others, such as gonorrhea, can only be transmitted through sexual contact.

Hepatitis Symptoms

Hepatitis A, B and C are all contagious viral infections that affect your liver. Hepatitis B and C are the most serious of the three, but each can cause your liver to become inflamed.

Some people never develop signs or symptoms. But for those who do, signs and symptoms may occur after several weeks and may include:

• Fatigue

• Nausea and vomiting

• Abdominal pain or discomfort, especially in the area of your liver on your right side beneath your lower ribs

• Loss of appetite

• Fever

• Dark urine

• Muscle or joint pain

• Itching

• Yellowing of your skin and the whites of your eyes (jaundice)

Gonorrhea Symptoms

Gonorrhea is a bacterial infection of the genital tract. The first gonorrhea symptoms generally appear within two to 10 days after exposure. However, some people may be infected for months before signs or symptoms occur. Signs and symptoms of gonorrhea may include:

• Thick, cloudy or bloody discharge from the penis or vagina

• Pain or burning sensation when urinating

• Abnormal menstrual bleeding

• Painful, swollen testicles

• Painful bowel movements

• Anal itching

Genital Herpes Symptoms

Genital herpes 0 is highly contagious and caused by a type of the herpes simplex virus (HSV). HSV enters your body through small breaks in your skin or mucous membranes. Most people with HSV never know they have it, because they have no signs or symptoms. The signs and symptoms of HSV can be so mild they go unnoticed. When signs and symptoms are noticeable, the first episode is generally the worst. Some people never experience a second episode. Other people, however, can experience recurrent episodes over a period of decades.

When present, genital herpes signs and symptoms may include:

• Small, red bumps, blisters (vesicles) or open sores (ulcers) in the genital, anal and nearby areas

• Pain or itching around the genital area, buttocks and inner thighs

The initial symptom of genital herpes usually is pain or itching, beginning within a few weeks after exposure to an infected sexual partner. After several days, small, red bumps may appear. They then rupture, becoming ulcers that ooze or bleed. Eventually, scabs form and the ulcers heal.

In women, sores can erupt in the vaginal area, external genitals, buttocks, anus or cervix. In men, sores can appear on the penis, scrotum, buttocks, anus or thighs, or inside the urethra, the tube from the bladder through the penis.

While you have ulcers, it may be painful to urinate. You may also experience pain and tenderness in your genital area until the infection clears. During an initial episode, you may have flu-like signs and symptoms, such as headache, muscle aches and fever, as well as swollen lymph nodes in your groin.

In some cases, the infection can be active and contagious even when sores aren’t present.

Genital warts (HPV infection) Symptoms

Genital warts, caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), are one of the most common types of STDs. The signs and symptoms of genital warts include:

• Small, flesh-colored or gray swellings in your genital area

• Several warts close together that take on a cauliflower shape

• Itching or discomfort in your genital area

• Bleeding with intercourse

Often, however, genital warts cause no symptoms. Genital warts may be as small as 1 millimeter in diameter or may multiply into large clusters.

In women, genital warts can grow on the vulva, the walls of the vagina, the area between the external genitals and the anus, and the cervix. In men, they may occur on the tip or shaft of the penis, the scrotum, or the anus. Genital warts can also develop in the mouth or throat of a person who has had oral sex with an infected person.

Chlamydia Symptoms

Chlamydia is a bacterial infection of your genital tract. Chlamydia may be difficult for you to detect because early-stage infections often cause few or no signs and symptoms. When they do occur, they usually start one to three weeks after you’ve been exposed to chlamydia. Even when signs and symptoms do occur, they’re often mild and passing, making them easy to overlook.

Signs and symptoms may include:

• Painful urination

• Lower abdominal pain

• Vaginal discharge

• Discharge from the penis

• Pain during sexual intercourse in women

• Testicular pain

Trichomoniasis symptoms

Trichomoniasis is a common STI caused by a microscopic, one-celled parasite called Trichomonas vaginalis. This organism spreads during sexual intercourse. The organism usually infects the urinary tract in men, but often causes no symptoms in men. Trichomoniasis typically infects the vagina in women. When trichomoniasis causes symptoms, they may range from mild irritation to severe inflammation. Signs and symptoms may include:

• Clear, white, greenish or yellowish vaginal discharge

• Discharge from the penis

• Strong vaginal odor

• Vaginal itching or irritation

• Itching or irritation inside the penis

• Pain during sexual intercourse

• Painful urination

If you suspect you have these or other STIs or that you may have been exposed to one, see your doctor for STI testing. Timely diagnosis and treatment are important to avoid or delay more-severe, potentially life-threatening health problems and to avoid infecting others.