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Differences Between Anal Warts, Hemorrhoids & Anal Fissures

One of the most typical health conditions confused with hemorrhoids is anal warts. They are sorta the same… yet they stem from entirely different causes and therefore are treated in very different methods. Anal warts are caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). This virus is highly contagious and often transmitted through sexual intercourse or skin-to-skin contact. An anal fissure is a small tear in the thin, moist tissue (mucosa) that lines the anus.

The major distinction of course is the occurrence of pain.

ANAL PAINS & CONDITIONS: ANAL WARTS, HEMORRHOIDS OR FISSURE

What are Anal Warts?

Anal warts (also called “condyloma acuminata”) are a condition that affects the area around and inside the anus. They may also affect the skin of the genital area. They first appear as tiny spots or growths, perhaps as small as the head of a pin, and may grow quite large and cover the entire anal area. They usually appear as a flesh or brownish color. Usually, they do not cause pain or discomfort and patients may be unaware that the warts are present. Some patients will experience symptoms such as itching, bleeding, mucus discharge and/or a feeling of a lump or mass in the anal area. Anal warts are caused by HPV and can be transmitted by direct contact ie. basically any contact exposure to the anal area (hand contact, secretions from a sexual partner) can result in HPV infection .

HPV infection does not lead to hemorrhoids.

What are Anal Fissures?

An anal fissure is a small tear or crack in the lining of the anus. It may occur when passing large or hard stools, straining during childbirth, or experiencing bouts of diarrhea. An anal fissure is usually a minor condition that goes away within six weeks. Home treatments can help ease pain and promote healing.

Causes of Anal Fissure

Anal fissure can occur as a result of any circumstance that puts excessive pressure on the lining of the anus. Thus there are a variety of causes, which may include:

  • Constipation with large or impacted stools
  • Chronic or persistent diarrhea
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (e.g. Crohn’s disease)
  • Childbirth
  • Infections such as syphilis, herpes, HIV or tuberculosis
  • Cancer

What are Hemorrhoids?

On the other hand, are a very painful condition. Symptoms of hemorrhoids are anal itching, pain (especially while sitting), blood on stool, and lumps near the anus. Increased pressure in the veins of the anus causes hemorrhoids. This is why hemorrhoids are common during pregnancy and after childbirth.

Hemorrhoid symptoms may include finding bright red blood on your toilet paper or seeing blood in the toilet after a bowel movement. Other common symptoms include rectal pain, pressure, burning, and itching. You may also be able to feel a lump in your anal area.

Hemorrhoids are common and usually not too serious. They can often be treated with home remedies, and you may not even need to be seen by a doctor.

But some symptoms of hemorrhoids, especially rectal bleeding, may also be caused by other diseases, some of them serious, like colon cancer.

Treatment of Anal Conditions:

 

Anal Warts Screenings, Tests & Checks:

Anal warts and hemorrhoids can both seem like lumps or masses of tissue round the anal area. However, there are difference scan result in a proper identification upon near inspection of the area.

Anal warts testing demands that your doctor may inquire as to the presence or absence of risk factors to include a history of anal intercourse, a positive HIV test or a chronically weakened immune system (medications for organ transplant patients, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, etc).

Anal warts’ physical examination should focus primarily on the anorectal examination and evaluation of the perineum (pelvic region) that includes the penile or vaginal area to look for warts.  Digital rectal examination should be performed to rule out any mass.  Anoscopy is typically performed to look within the anal canal for additional warts.  This involves inserting a small instrument about the size of a finger into your anus to help visualize the area.  Speculum examination may also be performed to aid in vaginal examination in women.

Hemorrhoids Treatment & Care:

Hemorrhoids are usually best treated in your own home through a high-fiber diet, a proper amount of exercise, and easily obtained over-the-counter relief. Home remedies often work nicely on hemorrhoids and surgery is just rarely needed.

Hemorrhoids are often kept away by keeping the lifestyle changes that were made to assist cure them.

You should seek treatment for hemorrhoid symptoms if:

  • You have rectal bleeding for the first time.
  • You have heavy rectal bleeding.
  • You have rectal bleeding that is not responding to home care.
  • You have other hemorrhoid symptoms, such as pain, pressure, itching, and burning, that do not respond to home care after a few days.
  • You have hemorrhoid symptoms along with other symptoms such as fever, weight loss, abdominal pain, or a change in bowel habits.

Anal Warts Treatment:

Anal warts, however, always have to be handled surgically, usually on an outpatient foundation. The warts will not go away by themselves. Instead, a physician has to make use of liquid nitrogen to freeze all of them off.

If warts are not removed, they can grow larger and multiply. Left untreated, warts may lead to an increased risk of anal cancer in the affected area. Internal anal warts may not respond to topical medications, so surgery may be required.

Anal warts will frequently come back for no cause under your control, because the virus can reside dormant in your skin cells for a long period. Post-treatment care and doctor’s supervision are often stressed to minimize chances of future outbreaks. When warts come back, they can usually be treated at your surgeon’s office. If a large number of new warts develop quickly, surgery may be needed again.

Treatment options for anal warts include:

  • Topical medication: These creams usually work best if the warts are very small and located only on the skin around the anus.
  • Topical medications that will freeze the warts (liquid nitrogen)
  • Topical medications that will burn the warts (Trichlorocetic acid, podophyllin)
  • Surgery: When the warts are either too large for the above mentioned treatments or are internal, surgery is considered. During surgery, the warts are surgically removed. The patient will be anesthetized for the procedure. The type of anesthetic depends on the number and exact location of the warts being removed. When there are many warts, your surgeon may perform the surgery in stages.
  • An internal examination will also be performed so that any lesions on the inside can also be found and treated.

Differences Between Anal Warts and Hemorrhoids

STI, STD Infection – 10 Symptoms Not To Ignore

STD’s/STI’s are common.  An STI is a sexually transmitted infection, and an STD is a sexually transmitted disease. There are about 20 million new cases of STD’s in the U.S. each year. More than half of adults will have one in their lifetime. If you haven’t been tested, you could pass an STD on to someone else. Even though you don’t have symptoms, it can be dangerous to your health and the health of your partner.

By taking special notice of the symptoms that your body is sending you will offer your medical doctor the necessary precautions related to testing and treating the right STI or STD.

STI or STD Infection – 10 Symptoms You May Be Infected.

Some STI’s/STD’s, including chlamydia and gonorrhea, can cause infertility. This is especially true for women. These diseases can cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), an infection of the uterus and other reproductive organs. PID can raise a woman’s risk for ectopic pregnancy, a pregnancy outside the womb.

Other STDs, such as syphilis and HIV, can be deadly. Left untreated for years, syphilis can also seriously damage your brain, nervous system, and heart.

Certain strains of HPV can cause cervical cancer in women, cancer of the penis in men, and cancer of the anus in both men and women. In addition, genital and anal warts are also highly contagious associated infections of HPV.

STD/STI Testing

Different STD’s have different tests. “It is important to discuss the types of sexual activities you have had. That will direct the doctor in which test to use,” Klausner says. You may need to give a blood or urine sample, or get swabs from your genital areas or mouth.

IF YOU CONCERNED THAT YOU’VE RECENTLY CONTACTED A SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTION OR DISEASE; YOUR DOCTOR SHOULD CHECK ALL POTENTIALLY EXPOSED SITES. IF YOU’VE HAD ANAL SEX, YOUR DOCTOR SHOULD CHECK YOUR RECTUM. IF YOU’VE HAD ORAL SEX, YOUR DOCTOR SHOULD CHECK YOUR THROAT. HOWEVER, THERE ARE ALSO SOME SWAB TESTS YOU CAN DO YOURSELF.

Never assume that your doctor automatically checks for STI’s or STD’s when you visit. “Just because you are getting a Pap smear [or blood test], that doesn’t mean you are getting tested for everything,” he says. “You have to ask which test you are getting. If you’re worried and you think you need a test, ask for it.”

STI, STD Infection – 10 Symptoms Not To Ignore

STI, STD Infection - 10 Symptoms Not To Ignore

LUMPS AND BUMPS

Any lumps, bumps or sores surrounding your nether-regions may be bad news.

While often any lumpy areas may be completely harmless, caused by heat or by an ingrown hair, it is important to know when to check any problem areas out.

If you notice that your swelling looks wart-like or feels rough to the touch, you may have contracted a strain of genital warts.

On the flip-side, if the lump is soft and looks similar to a spot or a pimple, it is probably just an ingrown hair.

Swollen testicles are another sign of potential STD/STI’s in men.

If any sores or blisters erupt around your genitals or in/around your mouth, it may sound obvious but you should get to the doctors as soon as you are able – as this indicates you could have contracted herpes.

PAIN

Listen to your body – if you ever feel a consistent pain in your tummy it is important not to ignore it.

Abdominal pain (or even testicles pain for men) that is continuous can indicate gonorrhea, chlamydia and trichomoniasis.

Pain during sexual intercourse in women. Pain felt during sex should also not be ignored – go to your doctor to get diagnosed as soon as you can.

CHANGES IN URINATION

Painful urination.

Burning or feeling pain when you wee can be a symptom of several STD’s, including herpes, chlamydia, gonorrhoea and trichomoniasis – as well as urinary tract infections, bladder infections, or kidney stones.

Because of this, it’s important to get checked-out if you ever have pain, or any other strange sensations, when you go for a wee.

And if you ever notice blood in your urine – get yourself to the doctors ASAP.

DISCHARGE

While discharge is perfectly natural for women, it has the potential to be serious. It all comes down to the color of the discharge.

If your discharge looks a green or yellow hue this it may be down to gonorrhea.

Any thick, white, or smelly discharge is also to be looked out for – and if it keeps happening should warrant a trip to the doctors.

Men experiencing discharge from their penis should also take heed.

While a discharge doesn’t necessarily mean you have an STD, it’s well worth getting any changes taken a look at.

ITCHING

While some itchy red patches can be harmless and may be down to eczema or a heat rash, any rashes or itching around your groin area is worth getting checked.

BLEEDING IRREGULARLY

This is a symptom more common in women than men is one of the big ones not to be swept under the rug.

If you’re bleeding irregularly or often it could mean an infection or possibly even cancer.

While, in women, irregular bleeding can happen naturally every now and then, it is important that you visit the GP should it become a regular occurrence.

Also, if you’re persistently bleeding after sex you should get yourself checked.

FEVERS, CHILLS, SORE THROAT & WEIGHT LOSS

You have a fever when your temperature rises above its normal range. What’s normal for you may be a little higher or lower than the average normal temperature of 98.6 F (37 C).

Depending on what’s causing your fever, additional fever signs and symptoms may include:

  • Sweating (including night sweats)
  • Shivering
  • Headache
  • Muscle aches
  • Loss of appetite
  • Dehydration
  • General weakness

Fevers by themselves may not be a cause for alarm — or a reason to call a doctor. However, when accompanied by additional symptoms of sore throat, headache, malaise, and weight loss – you should immediately see a doctor.